7 Sharpshooting Professionals Reveal Their WordPress Hosting Secrets
7 Sharpshooting Professionals Reveal Their WordPress Hosting Secrets

7 Sharpshooting Professionals Reveal Their WordPress Hosting Secrets

Welcome to Part 3 of the WordPress Web Hosting Series. 

This week I've rounded up 7 experts to spill the beans about WordPress hosting. 

Their mission is simple: Answer 5 questions on WordPress Hosting. 

But of course, you get more, as they share all their tips and tricks!

More...

The Magnificent Seven

Without further ado let me introduce you to The Magnificent Seven:

Adam Connell

My name is Adam Connell, I’m the founder of BloggingWizard.     

I was previously the Operations Manager at a UK based marketing agency before making the big decision to become a full time blogger and focus on growing my own online business.

adam-connell | azaharmedia.com
Question 1: What is the nature of your business (or businesses) and why do you need a web host?

I run several blogs which use the self-hosted version of WordPress making web hosting essential. There are alternatives to WordPress but they don’t give the same level of control/functionality.

Question 2: Describe your Web Hosting journey. Which hosts and types of service have you tried and why did you move?

My first ever web host was JustHost, I later moved to Site5 because JustHost was slow and had bad support.

I later tried the Site5 VPS and things were going well but it couldn’t cope with traffic spikes, later moved to Media Temple which could, and went from paying $95/month to $20/month.

After a while quality of support and response times to email tickets went down big time. Disappointing though as they have a great platform, but from a business perspective, failing to get a solution to my site going down after 7 days is unacceptable.

Fixed For You - WPX Hosting

I then moved my larger sites to WPX Hosting. I pay a bit more, but load times are faster and support resolves issues in around 30 minutes. My smaller sites are now on InMotion and SiteGround.

Question 3: What are the most important features/benefits you consider when choosing your Web Hosting service?

Most of the features that are important to me, I’d rank as being equally important because without any of them, things start to fall apart:

1) Speed – If page load times are too slow, it will destroy conversion rates and make the user experience horrible.

1) Security – This is a big one, but there are other tools to help like Sucuri who can clean up malware etc.

1) Support – The quality of support and response times are both incredibly important. If your website goes down, you need to be able to get support to fix it right away. None of this waiting for an hour to get on live chat or almost a day for a response to an email ticket which doesn’t fix the problem. When your website is your business, support is a big priority.

When your website is your business, support is a big priority. [Adam Connell]

Click to Tweet
Live Chat - WPX Hosting

2) Fair pricing – I’ve ranked this lower because ultimately, it’s worth paying more for a faster host with better support and security. But I believe pricing should be fair, for example, there are web hosts that price by new visitors each month, and when you look in the FAQ it says they reset what they think of as a “new” visitor every 24 hours. Those costs can soon mount up and this is one of the reasons I went with WPX Hosting, they charge by the bandwidth used which feels like a better way of doing things, well, from a customer perspective.

Question 4: Are there any web hosts you would definitely NOT use? And if so, why?

There aren’t many hosts I would avoid completely because a lot of them have good things going for them, but after a few bad experiences, I’d personally avoid:

GoDaddy – Some of my clients used to use GoDaddy and the experience was horrible. Firstly, the upsells confused a lot of people, it took ages to install WordPress and all of the sites were extremely slow, yes it was shared hosting but at the time I’d never known a shared host to perform so poorly.

JustHost – Another popular shared host, the first host I ever used. Initially I thought all was well but eventually page load times got insanely slow, even on a site with hardly any traffic. I had a bunch of issues with support and it seemed that cancelling was more difficult than it should be – even 2 years after cancelling I was still getting notifications about domain renewals.

123 Reg – I haven’t had a personal experience with this company, but one of my clients had their entire blog deleted by accident. That included all of the backups too.

Question 5: Are there any other tips or advice you can offer on selecting a web hosting service based on your experience?

There are a few tips that come to mind:

1) Unlimited hosting isn’t really unlimited – there is always a limitation in their terms of service.

2) Always check your page load times with a tool like LoadImpact – how fast your website loads for one person is irrelevant, it’s how it loads with simultaneous visitors which matters.

3) Budget hosting is a false economy – You generally get what you pay for with web hosts, budget hosts have their place, but if you’re serious about running an online business, you need a decent and reliable host, that means paying more.

4) Use a content delivery network (CDN) – If your web host is located in New York, USA and a visitor from Europe is accessing your website, they’ll receive slower load times than someone from USA. Using a CDN means the person from Europe will load your site from a location in Europe. The result is much faster page load times.

5) Don’t rely on your host for backups – Yes, you should be able to rely on your web host for backups, but the truth is that you should never do this. Keeping your own backups puts you in control and means that if anything ever goes wrong, you won’t have to re-build a blog from the ground up from old Word docs + emails.

6) Monitor your uptime with a tool like UptimeRobot – Uptime is important and most web hosts offer some sort of uptime guarantee. This will allow you to track uptime independently.

7) Always read the Terms of Service – It’s important to know the limitations of your hosting account. Some hosts instantly disable accounts if they go over certain limits.

Ashley Faulkes

Ashley Faulkes is an experienced web developer (14 years) who helps his clients create websites that not only look great, but rank on Google too. His experience in marketing as well as technical background give him a unique perspective on the whole website creation game. When he is not building sites or helping clients, you can find him deep in the Swiss alps mountain biking or eating chocolate!

ashley-faulkes | azaharmedia.com

​Question 1: What is the nature of your business (or businesses) and why do you need a web host?

We design websites for our clients, as well as providing SEO services to help people rank, so we use web hosting of all sorts on a daily basis.

Question 2: Describe your Web Hosting journey. Which hosts and types of service have you tried and why did you move?

I have had the pleasure of trying all sorts of shared hosting for clients; from Bluehost, Hostgator, Dreamhost to GoDaddy.

But by far the best shared hosting I have found and still use for my own sites today is SiteGround. Their support is top notch, they understand WordPress and the related issues and their servers are well controlled so even though you are on shared hosting they still run very well.

But by far the best shared hosting I have found and still use for my own sites today is SiteGround. [Ashley Faulkes]

Click to Tweet

Web Hosting

Question 3: What are the most important features/benefits you consider when choosing your Web Hosting service?
  1. Speed
  2. WordPress Support
  3. Price

Without a well running site, it can be very cheap but it is not worth it, as you just lose customers.

Question 4: Are there any web hosts you would definitely NOT use? And if so, why?

So far I don't have a black list of hosting companies I would not use. Some are better than others and I have my recommendations, but the only thing I like to keep away from is complete Managed Hosting as it is hard to get to a lot of technical areas I need access to.

Question 5: Are there any other tips or advice you can offer on selecting a web hosting service based on your experience?

Often the bigger companies are not the best as their support is overloaded and many of them do not have the technical know-how to support you. So make sure they offer specific support for what you need (e.g. WordPress, Drupal, Shopify, etc.)

Feel free to also speak to them beforehand and see if they can answer the most technical questions you can pose.

Also be careful with the “cheap” first year offers. These prices don't stay like that in the second year, and often rise steeply. So be sure to find out what the real long-term cost is. Unless you want to move your website every year, which most of you won't.

Eddie Gear

Eddie Gear has 12+ year’s experience in the field of Sales and Marketing. He writes articles on marketing and everything digital. When he's not working he loves to blog, work on his motorcycle and read a good book. Currently he's on a journey to build web-based products that will add value and provide opportunities for web-entrepreneurs.

Eddie Gear
Question 1: What is the nature of your business (or businesses) and why do you need a web host?

As a blogger, I create content (Zabroc), as an entrepreneur I run a web service and I am working on an eCommerce store (Pyrte: under development).

To run these businesses I require a reliable web host; one that can handle the workload as well as offer extensive security advantages so that I can focus on my business growth rather than worry about other issues.

Question 2: Describe your Web Hosting journey. Which hosts and types of service have you tried and why did you move?

I started my first blog on JustHost in the year 2007. At the time, it was an affordable and decent service provider. But as my blogs started to grow, I needed a stronger platform with better support, so I turned to TMD hosting.

In 2010, I was branching out to niche markets and wanted to switch hosts. I heard a lot of good things about HostGator and decided to go with it. However, I was utterly disappointed with their services and within a few months, shifted to what I consider to be one of the best hosting provides offering top class customer service - InMotion Hosting. My tech blog still runs on the VPS platform on InMotion and I have never had any regrets.

By 2014, I was focusing on building a number of web products so I decided to move them to a different host and for that I’ve chosen Bluehost, which, in my experience offers the quickest and most easiest way to install WordPress. My Bluehost experience thus far has been great, if you can ignore the support service wait times.

If I were to recommend a web host to anyone, I would say InMotion and Bluehost.

Question 3: What are the most important features/benefits you consider when choosing your Web Hosting service?
  1. Capability to handle workload
  2. After Sales Support
  3. Expansion options
  4. Price
Question 4: Are there any web hosts you would definitely NOT use? And if so, why?

HostGator – In my experience, their servers cannot even handle even small blogs. When I launched a new blog with nearly 10000 monthly visitors, I received server errors every other day as they could not handle the workload.

The support team simply told me that I had to upgrade my hosting as their shared hosting could only do so much. I stayed for less than 6 months with HostGator. It is the worst hosting I’ve tried, no wonder they offer such low rates!

Question 5: Are there any other tips or advice you can offer on selecting a web hosting service based on your experience?

When selecting a hosting account think of what it will do for your blog. It is not about the cost but more about the ability to handle your blog’s growth which will eventually pay for the hosting in the long run.

When selecting a web host it's not about the cost, it's their ability to handle your blog’s growth.[Eddie Gear]

Click to Tweet

Next, take a look at the scalability options and the after sales support. When these things are in line you know you have found a good hosting provider. If you decide to compromise on one or the other, you’ll find yourself looking for another hosting provider sooner than expected.

Jan Koch

Jan Koch is an entrepreneur and WordPress developer.

He hosts the global WP Summit and helps online entrepreneurs get the most out of WordPress. He shares actionable strategies to grow the impact of WordPress sites, in plain English. His mission is to empower online entrepreneurs all over the world to build better online platforms. He blogs at jkoch.me and tweets at @iamjankoch

jan-koch | azaharmedia.com
Question 1: What is the nature of your business (or businesses) and why do you need a web host?

I help business owners all over the world to generate more business from their WordPress website. My websites are the foundation of my business, I couldn't run without them.

My WordPress websites are the foundation of my business, I couldn't run without them. [Jan Koch]

Click to Tweet
Question 2: Describe your Web Hosting journey. Which hosts and types of service have you tried and why did you move?

I started with a German web host, but experienced slow loading times and a disappointing support. 

Now I use Cloudways, which is one of the best hosts I came across.

I also tested WP Engine, which was very satisfying, but currently lacks 24/7 support.​

Question 3: What are the most important features/benefits you consider when choosing your Web Hosting service?
  1. Speed
  2. Security
  3. Support
  4. Compatibility
Question 4: Are there any web hosts you would definitely NOT use? And if so, why?

Most German web hosts just can't keep up with the performance of Cloudways or WP Engine.

Question 5: Are there any other tips or advice you can offer on selecting a web hosting service based on your experience?

Get in touch with their support and test the response time. Have them explain how they speed up your website, how they handle security, and what services they provide outside of the plain hosting; e.g. backups, migration, easy installation, mails, etc.

Richard Martin

Hello, my name is Richard Martin.

I first started making money online way back in 2002, selling and shipping physical products on eBay. I used this experience as the basis for creating my own digital products. I also have a handful of successful Amazon Affiliate Niche Sites.

richard-martin | azaharmedia.com
Question 1: What is the nature of your business (or businesses) and why do you need a web host?

My online business is extremely diverse. I use web hosting to host my blog, to sell my digital products, and for my review sites and Amazon affiliate niche sites.

Question 2: Describe your Web Hosting journey. Which hosts and types of service have you tried and why did you move?

My very first host was GoDaddy. I used them to get my first eCommerce site, blog and eBook site up and running. I left because I was constantly getting ‘timeouts’ (where I would visit my own site and the browser would give me an error message) and ‘downtime’ where my site would not be accessible – for no apparent reason.

I decided to leave GoDaddy Shared Hosting, and moved to Bluehost Shared Hosting. I still have a Bluehost account, and used to use it for testing and developing brand new sites. However, my new host has that facility built in, so I no longer use it, or the account. Whilst I had no ‘downtime’ problems with Bluehost, there was, at times, a problem with speed and page load times.

Although such issues can be taken care of with the right plugins, I felt I no longer wanted to mess about – I just wanted something that gave me a fast loading site which would please my visitors.

Speed became a real problem for me and I was concerned about releasing the 2nd version of my digital product – I didn’t want an affiliate to send a truck load of traffic to my site, only for the site to buckle under the weight of traffic. That’s a revenue killer right there.

So after much deliberation, I moved to WP Engine, on a 10 site plan, and couldn’t be happier.

Question 3: What are the most important features/benefits you consider when choosing your Web Hosting service?

Speed and reliability is important not just to me, but my visitors. A slow loading site is the one thing that can result in a click on that back button, which none of us want.

Additional features are also huge for me. WP Engine comes with a built in CDN (which makes pages load even faster) and a staging area (where I can make changes to a live site, without it being public until I press the button). On top of this, it also includes automatic back ups, 1 click restores, in built caching, firewall security and inbuilt malware detection. These features have totally eliminated the need for any third party plugins which used to do the same job when I was with Bluehost.

It also allows me to create UNLIMITED test sites in its ‘transferable install’ area. I get a temporary domain name, and can create a complete site without it being seen by anyone. Once I have finished, I can just transfer it to one of my allotted hosting spaces.

Of course, support is a big one for most of us. GoDaddy support was truly shocking, Bluehost were pretty good, and WP Engine are out of this world. You get what you pay for!

GoDaddy support was truly shocking, Bluehost were pretty good, and WP Engine are out of this world! [Richard Martin]

Click to Tweet

These are my ranking factors when considering a web hosting service:

  1. Speed
  2. Features
  3. Price
  4. Support
Question 4: Are there any web hosts you would definitely NOT use? And if so, why?

Not really, because everyone’s experience will be different based on a number of variables. And with shared hosting and lower priced hosts, a lot of it comes down to luck, i.e. what sort of sites you are sharing the server with!

Question 5: Are there any other tips or advice you can offer on selecting a web hosting service based on your experience?

I appreciate not everyone wants to drop a big bundle of money on a higher priced host every month. Not only do I appreciate it, I totally understand it. When I started out, I didn’t want to spend $100 a month on hosting either, but as my sites grew, and I became more serious about things, I decided to give hosting the attention it deserved.

My best advice is to choose a host you can afford. No point in spending $100 a month on hosting if you aren’t making anything online. But when the time is right, then upgrade your host at the earliest opportunity. Your visitors will thank you - and so will Google!

Ron Killian

My name is Ron Killian.

I jumped online in 1998, full time since 1999. Started with affiliate marketing (almost 10 years). These day's I sell digital products, mostly Private Label Rights products, email marketing, run a couple membership sites, blog and still do a little affiliate marketing. I enjoy long walks on the beach and pictures of cute kittens "hanging in there".

ron-killian | azaharmedia.com
Question 1: What is the nature of your business (or businesses) and why do you need a web host?

From the beginning, I've had my entire business online. So obviously the need for hosting was a requirement. There have been some offline businesses I've tried, but the lure of a worldwide audience and unlimited earning potential sparked my online career.

Question 2: Describe your Web Hosting journey. Which hosts and types of service have you tried and why did you move?

As I type this, I am trying to remember how many hosts I've been through over the years. I think it's around 7 or 8 to date. Don't even remember all the names.

I've noticed a similar theme when it comes to hosting. I hear great things about a certain host, join up and all is peachy. But over time, the service begins to degrade. I don't know if it's the fact that they grow too fast and can't keep up, or they get lazy, or they get bought out, more on that in a moment.

Early on I used shared hosting, but it did not take long to realize that this type had its limitations, not to mention I was at the mercy of others.

I soon graduated to managed VPS hosting and have not looked back. VPS is like having your own dedicated server, but at a lower cost. Future plans may include a dedicated server, if the needs warrants.

Question 3: What are the most important features/benefits you consider when choosing your Web Hosting service?

1) Speed - The obvious has always been important for me when I am choosing a new host. If my websites are not fast enough, I lose potential customers (maybe forever) and possibly search engine ranks. We know if someone comes to our website and it's slow or there is a problem, there is a good chance they will never return.

2) Support - Things happen. There have been times I've broke my websites or parts of them. While I try to fix what needs to be fixed myself, I can't have my sites down for long, whether it's my fault or the host. Every minute my websites are down I am losing money so support needs to be quick and knowledgeable.

This was another problem with my last host, often the support personnel did not have the 'know-how' to help me. Nothing worse than a support ticket getting bumped up to the next department and you have to wait again...if you get a timely response at all.

3) Price - While I am price conscious, it is not always the deciding factor for me. I feel that most times, you get what you pay for. Since hosting is the most important part of my business, it is critical, I don't want my business to suffer because I want to save a few bucks. Frankly, I feel that too many people are lured in by low-cost or discount hosting offers, and it ends up costing them even more in the long run.

And to be even more frank, if one works a proven online business plan and takes action, their hosting will be more than paid for. It will then be a tool to generate even more income.

The other thing to remember is that most every quality hosting service will offer different plan options, so one can move up as their business grows.​

Question 4: Are there any web hosts you would definitely NOT use? And if so, why?

I would not recommend my last host, which was HostGator. Not saying they are the worst, but there were too many reasons to leave.

After they were bought out by the EIG group, things started going downhill. Almost immediately after the buyout, all hosting was moved to different servers, in a different state, which caused quite a bit of downtime for many customers. Even after the move, downtime happened and often when it occurred it lasted for hours on end. If I remember correctly, all my sites were down for up to 8 hours at a time. That is just unacceptable.

Next to suffer was the support. Wait times for phone and chat support soared. It was not uncommon to wait for an hour. Support tickets took days for a reply, if there was a reply at all. Often I would have to repost to the ticket to get any response. Or I would need to get on the phone to get any assistance.

After the buyout, my websites also took a hit when it came to speed. Speed tests showed it was slower. Actually just moving to my new host recently, my sites' speed jumped 8%. Granted it's not a huge jump, but it is an increase and every little bit helps.

The last straw was when I was having trouble with a WordPress plugin. After getting no reply for over 3 days to a support ticket, I decided I had to switch. They say they are getting better, but I wouldn't hold my breath. I know of so many people who have ditched.

Funny, switching to my new host, I now have a faster server, 3 times the memory and a much faster hard drive, for a few dollars a month cheaper. Pays to shop around!

Question 5: Are there any other tips or advice you can offer on selecting a web hosting service based on your experience?

Do Your ResearchThe biggest tip I can offer any one searching for a new host is to do your homework, do your research. I cannot stress it enough. If you're serious about building a business online, you need to be serious about choosing the right hosting service.

If you're serious about building a business online, then get serious about choosing your web host. [Ron Killian]

Click to Tweet

You could have the best website in the world, sell the best products in the universe, promote stellar affiliate products, whatever your business model, but if your websites do not function properly, none of what you've done will matter.

Of course we cannot believe everything we read online, but if we search enough we will notice a pattern, good or bad. Often a simple Google search will yield first page results of a scam.

Most every hosting service will have a Facebook page. Check it. Or if they have other social media accounts. Look high and low.

Also, don't be taken in by all the "reviews" online. If I had to hazard a guess, I'd say that probably 90% of them are either fake or simply affiliate promotions.

Be sure to also look for recent posts about a hosting service. Although they might have been outstanding in 2010, doesn't mean they still provide the same service. My last host was one of the best when I signed up several years ago, but things change and they can change fast.

1) Start On the Right Foot - When possible, go with VPS (virtual private server). Shared hosting services are just that; shared by others. What if someone else on the server makes a mistake and brings down the server? What if another user on the server gets hacked? It could make the entire server vulnerable.

2) Hosting and Domains - Another important point that is hosting related: ALWAYS use two DIFFERENT services for your domains and hosting. If you have to leave your host on a bad note, or they are being difficult, when you're in control of your domains, you can point them to any host you wish. Control of your domains is of the utmost importance.

3) Maintenance - It's important that you take care of your sites. Hosting services can only provide so much security and backup. Make sure to keep your sites up to date and have a plan in place for backups and security.

4) Migration - If you're switching hosts, and if you have a lot to move, take advantage of hosting provided migration. My last move was painless. I simply gave the new host my log in details for the soon-to-be-sacked hosting service and they moved everything for me with all the same login's. It's like they picked it up over there and set it all down over here. Saved me SO much time and frustration.

5) Preparation - One last thought... always be prepared to move. While it should be standard practice, you need to have backups of everything just in case you need it. Backups on your computer, backup hard drives, and something like a cloud system can save you.

A good example... while WordPress is an outstanding platform, too many times we get lazy and install plugins and themes through our WP dashboard. Or we edit files, such as theme stylesheets though the dashboard as well. Problem is, when we do that, we do not have backups. Then when you go to upload to a new hosting you find out you're missing all kinds of things.

My current choice of hosting services - KnownHost

Why? Fast and very qualified customer service. Quality hardware with responsible prices. I've been more than satisfied.

Vinay Kachhara

Hi, I’m Vinay Kachhara, a freelance writer and a blogger.

I blog at Aha!NOW, where I write about various personal, social, and professional aspects of life. I also write on topics related to blogging.

vinay-kachhara | azaharmedia.com
Question 1: What is the nature of your business (or businesses) and why do you need a web host?

I manage the life blog, Aha!NOW, which has been nominated as one of the best personal development blogs. It also hosts an activity and forum based community, called the Aha!NOW Blog Community (The ABC).

Harleena and I need a web host because our blog is on a self-hosted WordPress platform. It was earlier on the free Blogger platform, but we preferred to completely own our blog.​

Question 2: Describe your Web Hosting journey. Which hosts and types of service have you tried and why did you move?

After being on the free Blogger platform for about 6 months, we shifted our blog to WordPress and chose HostGator as our web host. We chose HG for its low web hosting rates and because it was a big brand and popular too, so we assumed it would be trustworthy (it was!).

We purchased the Baby Plan at HG and stayed with it for about 3 years.

It was good initially, however, as our blog and its site traffic grew, we started experiencing many problems, mainly the “exhaustion of CPU resources”. The HG support explained that since we were on a shared hosting account with many other sites sharing the same resources, they had to put our site down because it exceeded its limits.

So, we had to move on, as we were experiencing too much downtime.

Our blog is on SiteGround for the last 6 months, and we’re having a great time here. The site support is as good as the HG support and we have the shared hosting account here as well, but the difference is that the SiteGround people do not bring our site down even if it exceeds the usage of CPU resources, and the downtime is considerably less.

The reason probably is that SiteGround is not overcrowded, so our site gets to use a bigger share of its CPU resources than it did while hosted at HG.

SiteGround is probably not overcrowded, so our site gets to use a bigger share of CPU resources. [Vinay Kachhara]

Click to Tweet

Web Hosting

Question 3: What are the most important features/benefits you consider when choosing your Web Hosting service?

Based on the factors that I mentioned in my answer to the last question, I’d say that these are the important features that one should look for, in this order:

1) Capacity – Number of CPU seconds and script executions allowed per hour and per day.

2) Control Panel – Easy to use control panel with all the necessary features.

3) Support – Prompt support that really provides quick solutions.

4) Price – The price of the hosting plan should be comparable and justified.

But first, I’d advise people to do their diligent research and read the reviews of real users online. Though there may be different views, it gives you an overall idea about the services of the web host provider.

Question 4: Are there any web hosts you would definitely NOT use? And if so, why?

We only have experiences with HostGator and SiteGround. I’d say both are good, though SiteGround was able to fulfil the requirement of our growing blog. I’ve heard people having bad experiences with HG like bad support, but my experience was otherwise.

I haven’t tried any other hosting, so it’s not right to judge otherwise. 🙂

Question 5: Are there any other tips or advice you can offer on selecting a web hosting service based on your experience?

I’d say that the criteria for choosing a web hosting service depends on various factors:

1) The type of your site – I was okay with HG as far as our blog was more so static. Once I started using BuddyPress and BBpress on it, which made it highly dynamic, I started facing problems.

2) The traffic of your site – Our blog was doing well at HG while it was small in size. But once the traffic grew, I had to switch to SiteGround. High site traffic might consume more CPU resources.

You do not need the best of the best web hosting services if your requirements are met by a cheap and small hosting provider. But first you should understand your site requirements. However, reliability matters, so don’t just go for any web host who offers cheap hosting.

Hope these little tips help 🙂

Conclusion

Phew! What a great roundup from The Magnificent Seven.

My thanks to the guys for sharing their experience and providing such a variety of tips!

  • What was your takeaway from this? What did you learn about WordPress Hosting?
  • If you're on Shared Hosting - how's it going? Are you struggling or coping?
  • Any VPS bods out there? Care to share your experience?
  • And what about you Managed Hosting fans? Is it as good as they say it is?
David Hartshorne

I'm a freelance writer working with business owners, marketing teams, and digital agencies to create in-depth, actionable content that resonates with their audience. When I'm not writing about digital marketing, you’ll find me roaring for the Villa or chilling with a thriller.